Amanda Macias

Churchill's fabulous mother may have invented the world's most famous cocktail

Amanda Macias
Churchill's fabulous mother may have invented the world's most famous cocktail

Make no mistake, there is no other cocktail that rivals the profound historical and cultural significance of the Manhattan.

Adding to the allure, it's unclear how the Manhattan came about.

In "The Manhattan: The Story of the First Modern Cocktail," historian Philip Greene examines the various origins of the vermouth-laced drink.

According to Greene, the most popular theory and my personal favorite, takes place at New York's Manhattan Club and involves Winston Churchill's mother.

On December 29, 1874, Lady Randolph Churchill held a dinner in honor of Samuel Tilden, who helped to overthrow the notorious Tweed Ring and who was about to become governor of New York.

It was at this dinner party that the Manhattan supposedly came to be.

"For the occasion, a bartender, whose name has escaped eternal fame, concocted a new appetizer—of rye whiskey, sweet vermouth, and bitters."

"It spread around the world as the Manhattan cocktail."

Cheers to that!